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War Horse’s Spectacular Journey

War Horse logoTony-Award winning stage spectacle moves families, audience members to tears

By David Freeland


War Horse, the astounding theatrical experience opening this week at The Buell Theatre, exerts its pull from the moment the title character, Joey, first trots on stage as a foal, petted by his owner and best friend, 15-year old Albert.  The audience gasps, aware that Joey is a puppet, not a real horse, but captivated by the way he shudders and whinnies at Albert’s loving touch.  Joey’s lifelike eyes, shining and reflective, draw us into the soul of his journey; as the evening progresses, and Albert sets out to rescue Joey after he has been sold to the English cavalry, we find ourselves carried along and hoping for Joey to make it home.

Andrew Veenstra, Christopher Mai, Derek Stratton, Rob Laqui_smIt’s that kind of emotional power that has made War Horse an international phenomenon, sweeping up audiences and awards on both sides of the Atlantic and even inspiring an Oscar®-nominated film directed by Steven Spielberg.  War Horse won five 2011 Tony® Awards (including Best Play) for its New York premiere plus a Special Tony® Award for Handspring Puppet Company for creating the 11 puppets at the heart of the show.

“One of the things we like to imagine,” observes Basil Jones, who runs Handspring with co-founder Adrian Kohler, “is people in the audience nudging the person next to them, saying, ‘did you see that?’” 

Catherine Gowl, Nick LaMedica, Laurabeth BreyaSet during the First World War, War Horse combines a powerful story with thrilling stagecraft and music.  In addition, it showcases what may be the most inventive use of puppetry ever seen on stage.  Soon after meeting him as a young horse, we watch in amazement as an adult Joey, seven feet tall, materializes before our eyes.  Two puppet masters working inside Joey’s frame (built of light, malleable cane) raise and lower his torso, letting out forceful breaths, while a third manipulates his ears, lifting and pulling them back to register tender shades of emotion.  Spielberg’s film version of War Horse employed real horses, but these onstage creations fully personalize equine ideals of courage, strength and loyalty in ways that reinforce the themes of the story.   

“Spielberg made a terrific film,” enthuses Michael Morpurgo, upon whose beloved novel War Horse is based, “but cinema has its limitations.  It isn’t live, and that’s the difference.  What’s amazing about the stage show is that, whether it’s the music, design, or lighting, the puppets, the quality of acting or direction, it’s ingenious and unique.  It’s a theatrical event.”

Grayson DeJesus and Michael Wyatt CoxDuring World War I, more than one million horses were conscripted by the British military alone; of these, only 62,000 returned.  As Joey is forced into battle, serving in both the British and German armies, we are moved by his bravery and the trust he places in those who exploit his strength.  His innocence makes him seem above the fighting: in War Horse, animals behave with a dignity that humans do not always achieve.  Still, Joey is unprepared for the true brutality of 20th century warfare.  In a brilliant scene that defines the excitement of Act Two, he faces a new kind of foe: a massive tank rolling his way, prepared to flatten everything in its path.  The scenic design is so visceral that we are rushed into battle alongside Joey, enveloped in the sound and smell of combat.  Joey rears on his hind legs as the tank pitches toward him and the stage goes black. 

“The First World War is emblematic,” suggests Mervyn Millar, War Horse’s puppetry director, “in the way the possibilities of destruction changed.  You see Joey standing, looking at the tank, which advances without logic, without thought.  Joey tries to work out what it means, what it wants, and it doesn’t want or mean anything.  It just destroys.”

Joey’s plight resonates with anyone who has ever loved an animal or taken a pet into the family.  As Albert continues his search, we are reminded of the ways in which animals remain with us through many stages of our lives, giving much and asking for little.

“People emotionally invest in animals,” Millar believes.  “I think everyone can empathize with Joey.”

Andrew Veenstra, Christopher Mai, Derek Stratton, Rob LaquiDetermined to save his friend, Albert runs away from home with the hope of getting close to the front.  But in trying to rescue one family member, he hurts another, leaving behind a mother anxious with worry.  War Horse’s relevance comes from our awareness that, nearly a century after the start of the First World War, families are still being separated by armed conflict.        

“We talk a lot about the history of the war,” remarks Chris Harper, producer for the National Theatre of Great Britain (which first staged War Horse in London), “but at the heart of the show it’s just a family, struggling to deal with life.  The thing that’s exciting about War Horse is that it appeals to lots of generations.  We see grandparents bringing their kids, wanting to explain the history from their own personal journeys with World War II or more recent conflicts.  It’s a production that brings the family together.”

Will Albert find Joey in time?  As War Horse reaches its beautiful climax, the hopes of parents, children, and beloved friends – both onstage and off – merge into a shared experience, as tissues are drawn from pockets and eyes glisten with tears.       

“We get people coming back again and again,” Harper explains, “and they always have the same reaction.  It awakens something in you.  War Horse makes grown people cry.”

 

War Horse plays Denver’s Buell Theatre Jan 8-20. Tickets: 303.893.4100 or 800.641.1222.